When training your puppy, it’s important to give your pup a sense of security and direction. Setting aside a specific area for your dog to do his business will not only make potty training easier, but also faster than if you had tried to use multiple potty places.

To set aside an appropriate place for elimination, take a look at your home. Do you have enough space to accommodate your puppy indoors and outdoors? What areas can you use according to your neighborhood guidelines? Do you have a yard that’s fenced in or is safe for your puppy to use? All of these questions are things you must ask yourself when potty training your pup.

For indoor security during colder months or for spaces that lack porches, consider paper training as a safe bet. Set aside a specific area in your home with newspaper and instruct your dog to do his business. If you happen to have a bit more space or if you have porch access, you can always try the Porch Potty as an option. This compact potty training area is easy, convenient and perfect for your puppy.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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Here’s why dog owners should not make their dogs wait.

Everyone has to go potty. But not every potty area is convenient, especially for a dog. Most owners have to take their dog outside to potty, whether it’s out in the yard or out for walks. Regardless of where, the question is always – when?

The body naturally wants to eliminate waste. But what happens when we don’t let it? What happens when we don’t permit our dog to regularly take care of their physical necessities? Not only is it harmful, but it’s just plain mean not to let your dog potty when they need to. Consider if you had to hold in your bowel movements for a long time. Wouldn’t you feel uncomfortable? Perhaps even in pain?

Every good dog owner understands the importance of letting their dog take care of nature’s call, but it’s just as important to understand why.

Age and size matters

Not all dog’s bodies are designed the same, and every dog has different habits. As for puppies, they should not be forced to hold their potty for any longer than two hours. It goes up an hour after their first birthday. For the most part, three hours is a good schedule of elimination for the average adult dog and eight hours is the maximum hold time. Senior dogs tend to have less bladder control as well, so be sure you address their timely needs.

Do keep in mind that if you have to go, it’s likely your dog has to go too. This is one of the best ways to gauge potty time for your dog because it acts as a regular reminder about what’s necessary.

Feeding and drinking schedules play a part in potty needs. If they eat, they will need to potty, usually within the hour. Dogs are creatures of habit and will regularly need, or at least want, to go out during specific times of the day.

Physics apply – namely larger dogs have a higher bladder capacity than smaller dogs. Small dogs, therefore, need to be provided potty opportunities more often.

The waiting one

As far as your dog is concerned, they show signs whenever they need to potty. Circling, pawing at the door, coming to get your attention are all signs. A dog relies on their owner to help them fulfill a happy day. Initially, a dog feels the need to urinate when their bladder is half-full. The body senses the swelling of the bladder and informs the dog that it’s ready to be relieved. A dog may start to show signs of needing to go before it is vital that they go. This is to give you adequate time to make arrangements to allow them to relieve themselves.

Remember that if they can’t eliminate in the proper area, they will do so wherever they feel most secure – such as behind furniture. This is mostly because they understand that what they’ve done isn’t according to the rules, but as far as their body is concerned, they needed to do what is only natural.

Obstruction of potty time

The important thing to know is that when a dog is forced to hold their potty for extended periods, it can cause physical damage to their body.

A dog that can’t potty will often avoid eating or drinking as well, resulting in dehydration and malnutrition. If your dog isn’t eating, it could be because they are sick, but it is often due to constipation. Rawhide bones have a tendency to build up in the intestines, causing blockages. If they can’t potty for long periods, it can result in an impacted colon, requiring laxatives or even surgery to remove and repair the damage.

The bladder is something completely different. A bladder infection, or cystitis, is an inflammation of the bladder due to bacterial or fungal infection. When your dog is forced to hold their urine for extended periods, it gives the urine time to build bacteria. Resulting infections can occur which will only cause your dog to need to potty more frequently until treated properly.

Give them an option if you can’t be there to provide the opportunity. If you spend long hours away from home, consider an indoor litter box so they can potty at their own leisure. This will help keep them from overwhelming their body or even secretly eliminating behind the couch.

Some dogs can hold it in for a long time, but that doesn’t mean that it’s okay for them to. Take care of your dog properly and make sure they stay happy and healthy.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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When you bring home a new puppy, you want to be sure that potty training is as fast, easy, and painless as possible. By keeping in mind these three essentials, you can be sure that your pup transitions into proper elimination without hassle or too much difficulty:

Crate

If used properly, their crate, or den, can become their favorite spot in the house and it helps control toileting because dogs will not use their crates as a bathroom. However, you have to pay attention to the size of your dog’s crate. Make sure it is large enough for your dog to stand, turn around, and lay down in comfortably but not so large that they can use a corner as a bathroom. Where you put the crate is equally as important. Dogs are very social and want to be part of the family activity. The crate should be in a bright area of the home where people are.

Diet

Your puppy’s diet is also very important in housebreaking your dog. A good premium food (no fillers, additives) will provide the nutrients your growing dog needs while ensuring their toileting isn’t compromised. Dry kibble is best, but you can use a little wet food every now and then. Be sure to feed your dog at the same time every day to control potty habits.

You

Be supportive, active, and encouraging with your pup. This is a new and exciting time for the both of you. Use potty training best practices and soon the transition will be over!

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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When potty training your pup, it’s important to remember that accidents happen.

Much like a small child, your puppy is going to have accidents because of sheer biology. Within 15 to 20 minutes of taking in food or water, their bodies tend to want to eliminate. Sometimes they just can’t make it in time or they are still learning how to tell you when they need to go. Whatever the reason, it’s still important to remember that any new puppy is going to have accidents. However, it’s the way you deal with the accidents that’s so important.

If your pup does have an incident, quietly clean it up in a matter-of-fact way. Yelling or punishing the puppy for making an accident may not be the best policy, as it may result in negative behavior. Being supportive and understanding isn’t the right option always either, as it may reinforce that having an accident is “okay.” Instead, ignore your dog as you do it and walk away with patience. It’s going to take a little time.

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When training your puppy, it’s important to give your pup a sense of security and direction. Setting aside a specific area for your dog to do his business will not only make potty training easier, but also faster than if you had tried to use multiple potty places.

To set aside an appropriate place for elimination, take a look at your home. Do you have enough space to accommodate your puppy indoors and outdoors? What areas can you use according to your neighborhood guidelines? Do you have a yard that’s fenced in or is safe for your puppy to use? All of these questions are things you must ask yourself when potty training your pup.

For indoor security during colder months or for spaces that lack porches, consider paper training as a safe bet. Set aside a specific area in your home with newspaper and instruct your dog to do his business. If you happen to have a bit more space or if you have porch access, you can always try the Porch Potty as an option. This compact potty training area is easy, convenient and perfect for your puppy.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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Housebreaking your beloved canine companion means deciding when and where you want your dog to eliminate. Once you have determined the type of routine you want your pet to follow, the next step is to select the specific spot where you want your dog to do his business. Having a designated potty area will help make the toilet training process a whole lot easier!

Whenever your dog goes potty, chemicals within his waste are released. These chemicals are called pheromones and are what tell him to poop again when he goes back to his potty area. These chemicals are also what let other canines know that this particular spot has already been taken and so they will have to find another one.

Establishing a potty area is crucial to housebreaking your dog. Now what if he is having difficulty understanding where his potty area is and is constantly eliminating inside the house or in places where he isn’t supposed to go? What you can do is try feeding him where he is having these accidents. Generally, dogs are clean animals and will not dirty the place where they eat or sleep, so by feeding your pet in the accident areas, you can reduce the chances of your dog peeing or pooping again in those spots.

As much as you want your pet to be accident-free from day one, you have to understand that all dogs have accidents, so expect one every now and then at first. Housebreaking your canine friend is a process, not an instant solution. It’s more like running a marathon than running around your block once.

Keep in mind that positive reinforcement will always give you better results than any other training method. Punishment does not work because your dog will be unable to make the connection between his mess and the reason for your anger. In fact, getting mad at him will only lead him to become afraid of you.

I highly encourage you to practice patience and be positive. Your dog will pick up on your positive energy and this will keep him from resisting your training or getting frustrated.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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Caring for a dog is much more than just feeding it daily. One of the saddest things in the world is a neglected animal – especially a doting dog. Dogs love and need bundles of attention and tender loving care. Their whole day revolves around when they can expect some love and attention from you, their owner. Basically, your dog gives you a lifetime of unconditional love, friendship, and loyalty. In return for all of his/her love and affection he/she counts on you to provide all his/her necessities such as food, water, a safe shelter, exercise, veterinary care and much more.

A good place to start when caring for your appreciative pooch is with identification tags. Outfit your pooch with a collar and ID tag that includes all your vital contact information such as your name, address, and an easily reachable telephone number. No matter how careful of an owner you are, there’s always a chance your lovely companion may become lost at some point. A collar and ID tag will greatly increases the chance that you and your pet will be happily united again.

After you have collared and ID tagged your dog, you should think about vaccination. It’s extremely important to follow local laws for licensing your dog and vaccinating him/her for rabies – not only for your pooch but for your own well being too. A great place to look for information is your local animal shelter or humane society. These agencies can give you information regarding legal requirements, and where to have your passionate pooch vaccinated.

Not only does your doggie need vaccinating, it also needs regular check-ups with a veterinarian. A dog is just like you or I, it needs regular check-ups with his/her doctor to ensure the proper health of your pet. If you do not have a veterinarian, ask your local animal shelter or your loving pet-owning friend for a referral and check out the provided information on choosing a veterinarian.

Once you have found a veterinarian both you and your dog love, then it’s important to think about spaying or neutering your dog. This always makes me think of Bob Barker and his passion for spreading the importance of spaying and neutering through word of mouth on the hit game show The Price is Right. Dogs that have this routine and minor surgery tend to live longer, be healthier, and have fewer behavioral problems such as biting, running away, and general aggression. By spaying or neutering your dog, you are also doing your part to reduce the disheartening problem of pet overpopulation.

Now that we have addressed your pets’ medical needs, you should think about proper nutrition. It is vitally important to give your pooch a balanced diet with constant and consistent access to fresh clean water. Your veterinarian can give you information about the proper type of food, and the amount that will keep your companion healthy and happy. He or she can also give you information on how often to feed your dog, because various breeds require different amounts of food.

When caring for your dog you have to think of proper shelter. A fenced yard with a doghouse is an ideal setting for your pooch. Remember that if your dog is large and active, it typically needs more space and room outside to run and play. However, dogs should never be left outside alone for extended periods of time. This all goes back to the deep down need dogs have for love and attention. Dogs truly need and crave companionship and should spend most of their time inside with the family – since they are a vital family member.

Just like you or I, your dog needs plenty of exercise and movement to stay healthy. Make sure he/she gets enough exercise to keep him/her physically fit but not exhausted. Many dog owners agree that playing a game, or with use of throw toys with their canine companion, along with twice daily walks provide sufficient exercise for your pooch. If you should have any questions or concerns with this, once again it is wise to check with your loving veterinarian for their advice on the proper amount of physical activity suited to your dog.

Many experts agree there is also a simple rule to remember when thinking of care for your dog – off property, on leash! Even if you have a valid license for your dog, an official rabies tag, and a collar and ID tag, your companion should still be on a leash. Your dog should not be allowed to roam outside of your home or fenced yard – ever. It may sound harsh but it is the best bet for you, your community, and your dog to keep control of your pet at all times. The old saying “it’s better to be safe than sorry” applies here.

Along with keeping your dog on a leash, many experts believe it is important to enroll your canine companion in a dog training class. Positive training will allow you to control your companion’s behavior safely and humanely. Not only will this bring some control to your hands, it provides a terrific opportunity to enhance the bond you share with your pooch. The humane society, as well as your veterinarian, can provide information on reputable dog trainers.

Lastly and most importantly in thinking about proper dog care is love – and lots of it! Be loyal to, loving, and patient with your faithful canine companion. Your pet needs you and loves you – that is something you must remember. Make sure the expectations you have of your dog are reasonable and healthy. Also remember if you do encounter some behavioral problem, the vast majority of them can be solved with a little time, effort and supporting love. If at any time you are struggling to meet all the things that are required to love and care for your dog, you must contact your veterinarian or local animal shelter for advice and direction. If for some reason you can’t handle the responsibility of loving and caring for your animal, someone else gladly can and will.

Christine Beals is a professional writer who provides information for dog training and German Shepherds for Savvy Cafe.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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Everyone seems on edge about the latest outbreak of avian flu. People in China are told to kill their poultry in order to keep the virus from spreading. Meanwhile people in the United States watch on in fear that the avian flu will come to their shores. So what exactly is all the hubbub about? After all, every winter millions of people come down with bird flu.

Origin of Influenza

Influenza, the term, came into use around 1504, though it had little to do with the virus. It came from the word: influence. At the time, influence meant: “the ethereal power of the stars acting on men.” It was basically a supernatural way of explaining the effects of disease on people at the time. During a particularly nasty outbreak of the flu in Europe during 1743, the term was officially attached to the name of the disease. 96 years later, the term was shortened to just: flu.

The flu, itself, is a whole family of viruses called Orthomyxovirids. They are a diverse family that are commonly found in the guts of birds. The specific type of viruses that infect birds, are called type A flu. It was one of these type A’s that was believed to have infected people a long time ago. Thus giving us, the flu for the first time. Though the virus that initially infected man, has long since evolved into a variety of human specific strains, the initially origin appears to lay squarely among birds. As such, all human flu bugs could, technically, be called: avian flu.

Pathogens and specificity

Pathogens are viewed as being any living organism that is capable of causing a disease. It is a term that is generally reserved for bacteria, fungi and viruses. Pathogens are usually very specific in who, or what, they infect. This has a lot to do with the way in which they are constructed.

Both bacterial and viral outer structure, consist of a receptor binding proteins. These proteins give the pathogen a certain geometry. This geometry allows the pathogen to attach to complementary receptor sites on the cells of the critter that they are trying to infect. Because of the wide variety of life forms on the planet, each cell type has a different arrangement of receptors. Most of the time, the pathogen’s geometry will not fit these receptors, and the critter remains immune. Only those unlucky few species, whose cell receptors do fit, are the ones that have to suffer the infection.

Occasionally, though, a new pathogen comes along that has a geometry that is general enough to allow it to latch onto many different species. These are the pathogens that are often the more deadly.

Influenza is one of these general viruses. It is capable of infecting most bird species. It’s also very good at doing what all life forms do. It evolves. This has allowed it to cross multiple species barriers, and jump from birds, to people, to pigs, cows, and horses. Thus making influenza a very cosmopolitan virus family. This still doesn’t explain all the worry about this recent outbreak of avian flu though. For that, one must go back in time to 1918, and the Spanish flu.

It was the close of World War I, and the world appeared to be returning back to a more peaceful state. Then, in various parts of the globe, people started coming down with a particularly virulent form of the flu. This was a unique case though. Instead of the very young, and elderly dying, it was affecting young men and women instead. Usually these are the most immune to the effects of the flu. By the end of 1918, this form of the flu had killed ~50 million people. It was the largest pandemic (worldwide epidemic) in recorded history. So what happened?

Normally when one gets the flu, it is more of a hassle than anything else. This has a lot to do with the fact that the flu types we normally catch, are viruses that have infected us before. They have changed just enough so that they can infect us again, but they still remain recognizable to our immune system. As such, our bodies can keep the virus in check, and then eventually eliminate it. The 1918 flu, though, was different. It is now largely believed to have been a case where a new flu virus had hopped species. It went from birds to humans, possibly after circulating and hybridizing inside pigs (which can catch both bird and human versions of the flu). This new bug was completely alien to our immune systems and thus, took many completely by surprise.

This is what has many scared about this newest avian flu virus (dubbed: H5N1, for the specific proteins found on it). It has proven to be particularly virulent among birds, and the few cases of it infecting people have many worried that another pandemic is on the rise.

Zoonoses.

Influenza is a type of disease referred to a zoonosis. It means that it can be transmitted from one animal group, to another. Zoonotic diseases used to be further broken up into those that humans catch from other animals (anthropozoonoses) and ones that other animals catch from humans (zooanthroponoses). Unfortunately, both terms have been misused and confused so much, that neither is particularly favored anymore. Now they are all viewed as zoonotic diseases. In the end this makes the most sense, as human beings are animals anyway. To break things up any further, just seems excessive.

The flu is not the only zoonotic disease that humans get from other animals. Our primate cousins have given us quite a few different diseases including: malaria, hepatitis B, Dengue fever and lymphoma. Of course the most infamous of these zoonotic diseases would probably be HIV.

Though there are those that would like to believe that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus was a genetically engineered weapon that was released among the African populace (they give far too much credit to genetic engineers, who are proud enough to make yeast that can fluoresce), the simian origin of HIV is pretty well established. HIV has close ties to the simian version: SIV (Simian Immunodeficiency Virus). The big difference between the two, besides their first letters, is that SIV rarely kills the apes it infects. In fact, many apes are capable of carrying viral loads equivalent to those seen in humans with advanced AIDS, yet rarely show any signs of trouble. This suggests that the host and the pathogen have been doing this for a very long time, and the host’s body has found a way to handle the virus. Humans only recently acquired HIV. As such, our bodies have yet to “learn” how to deal with the threat that this virus poses. Which is one reason why HIV is so very virulent at the moment.

These are just some of the diseases that other animals have given to humans. But what of the reverse? What have we given our animal brethren?

Many of the “classic” diseases that most humans catch, are ones that we are capable of giving to our primate cousins. This includes the flu, measles, chicken pox and tuberculosis.

One particularly nasty disease that we are capable of transmitting is the infamous Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD). FMD rarely affects humans, but it does use us as a carrier for it. The disease can hang out in our nasal passages, throat, and on our clothing. It usually infects various forms of livestock (cattle, pigs, sheep, goats). Symptoms usually include fever and prominent sores on the feet and mouth (hence the name). Most infected animals do survive. Only ~5% die from the disease.

The second disease is far more pernicious, and the victims have us to blame. It is the coral disease referred to as: white pox. This disease can kill up to 10 square centimeters of coral a day (~120ft a year). Over the past decade over 90% of Caribbean reef coral (Acropora palmata), have died. The culprit behind it is the little human gut bacterium: Serratia marcescens. While humans can occasionally fall victim to this bacterium, it usually doesn’t infect us. Instead it lives in our guts and gets expelled in our feces. Improper sewage treatment has resulted in human excrement flowing out into the Caribbean, where the newly released bacterium has infected the local coral.

So remember; the next time you start to feel under the weather, don’t worry about coughing on your dog. Chances are, your canine pal probably won’t get it. Unless, of course, it is the flu.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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Being alone can be really frightening, especially when you are a kid. A natural reaction of a child when left alone is to cry. We have all gone through this when we were young, We were always glued to our parents, especially to our moms. We do not want to be away from them. This is human instinct since when we were born, our mom is the first person that we lay our eyes on. in fact, we’ve already formed an attachment when we were still inside our mother’s womb.

Being left alone can be very emotional and stressful. It can be a difficult experience. But this fear of being isolated is not only exclusively felt by human beings. Animals are no exception. Even dogs, considered to be man’s best friend, suffer the same emotional predicament.

Dogs are naturally social creatures, they are pack animals. Like babies that develop an attachment to their  mothers, dogs, too, develop a very strong bond with their canine female parents. These pups would only want to be with their turf, where the mother or father can guard them or provide food through the female dog’s mammary glands. But once this canine family attachment is dissolved, the dog immediately turns its attention to their owner or caretaker.

Dogs that become too dependent on their owners also do not want to be left alone.  When dogs are left alone by their owners, they become really upset. As “dog depression” sets in, they become restless and even destructive. This condition is called Separation Anxiety.

Separation anxiety in dogs is one of the most common canine behavioral problems encountered by veterinarians and seasoned dog breeders. Dogs can develop separation anxiety much faster if they do not have enough “socialization”.  It can also occur if a dog is repeatedly transferred from one owner to another. Dogs that came from animal shelters and dogs that experienced traumatic events such as being in the house during a fire, during a burglary attempt, or while an alarm system sounded may show signs of anxiety.

A dog suffering from separation anxiety will become extremely anxious and distressed.  Some signs of distress in your dog may include any of the following:

· Excessive barking and whining when left alone

· Incessant chewing on variety of things and destroys objects

· Urinate, defecate and vomit in different locations in the house.

· Demands too much attention from you when you are at home

· Gets overly excited when you return home

Dogs that fail to cope with a sudden change in environment may also develop separation anxiety. It is often difficult to treat this condition because the behavior only occurs when the owner is not around. It can also be alarming when the owner leaves for an extended period of time.

Experts say that there are medications that can suppress anxiety. These are often used on dogs with severe separation anxiety or when owners simply must leave the dog alone for an extended period while treatment is being done. The use of drugs allow the dog to spend extended periods of time free of anxiety. A veterinarian should be consulted for further information about the use of safe and effective anxiety- suppressing drugs.

These are other ways to reduce separation anxiety in your dog:

· Make arrivals and departures very low key

· Give your dog something to do when he is alone

· Plan your exits

· Leave a radio or TV on so he can listen to human voices when left alone

· Confine your dog in a crate that will also serve him as shelter

· Exercise your dogs

It is important to take immediate measures once you suspect that your dog has this condition. Visit a veterinarian and inquire about a dog stress treatment program. Keep in mind that your pet’s disorder can be treated and that they also need proper care and attention. So, if you noticed that your dog is so stuck on you, you might consider taking your “best friend” to the veterinarian.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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Everyone is surely going to get excited when trying to adopt a dog. Truly a man’s best friend, you can rely on your pet dog in giving you company, cuddling up together and some can even guard your house. You need to review your personal lifestyle and needs when adopting a dog. It is a major decision whether or not you would choose to have a puppy or an adult as a pet. Before deciding on which dog to adopt, here is some useful information that might help you decide.

On Puppies

* Bringing up a puppy is an advantage because this means that you would guide its growth and well being. You would have the chance to raise it up according to what you want. This means you can ensure that it is properly nurtured with the right dog food, ensure that necessary dog shots are given and prevent heartworm at this early stage. Having your puppy personally trained is also a plus since you can teach him exactly what you want.

* You should adopt a puppy when it is at least 10 weeks old. Puppies need a lot of time to be cared for by their mothers. This is a crucial stage for them. They somehow gain a psychological advantage for both puppy and for the mother dog as well.

* A puppy can easily adjust to new surroundings as compared to an adult dog. Although most puppies may cause minimal to major damage to your personal stuff while they are in the stage of teething. They need to be housebroken and house training needs a lot of time, effort and patience from the owner.

* There is no assurance of what a puppy would look like when it gets old; especially if it is a mixed breed. Also, his temperament might change too when he grows up.

* Most pet owners love how puppies can be entertaining. They are very cute and adorable pets that is a hit for both children and grown ups. Puppies can be easily regarded as one of the family.

On adult dog 

* You would have less of a fuss taking care of an adult dog. They already have this established behavior that you can easily adopt too. By being with the dog more often, you would have more or less an idea of what its temperament is.

* You need to get as much information that you can when adopting an adult dog. Take note of its habits and mood swings. You can acquire these valuable data from the previous owners of the dog. Some adult dogs may have some behavior issues. It is important to take note of them.

* It may take some time and effort for an adult dog to be completely comfortable with a new owner.

* Take note that you need to introduce an adult dog to your children and other household members. This would help the dog be familiar with them and helps them refrain from biting or barking thinking that they maybe strangers.

* Adult dog may not need your full attention unlike puppies need and would require lesser trips to the veterinary.

* For a fully grown dog physique and behavior is basically not a variable anymore. What you see is basically what you get.

* Most dogs are housebroken already so they would cause lesser damage to your belongings and don’t wake up at night like most puppies do. They have over grown the impulse of chewing things he has his eyes on.

* An older dog can easily adapt to other pets, like other dogs or cats, if you have a group of them at your household.

Adopting a dog is not an easy task and choosing which one to adopt can be a little tricky too. Everyone loves sweet looking puppies, but not everyone can stand up to the tiresome house training. Though most would appreciate the bonding shared with them. Adult dogs need no great amount of guidance but can still turn out to be a lovable pet. Whichever you think is the right pet for you, just keep in mind that taking care of them needs a lot of time and effort. In return, they would always keep you company and has a ready smile with an excited wag of tail waiting for you everyday.

Keeping up with your pet supplies can be just another thing you don’t want to have to remember. After a long day at work and going to the store, the last thing you want to do is have to go “to the store” again. Consider home delivery of your pet supplies!

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